Friedensnobelpreis Belfast Agreement

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Search results: 1887. Exactly: 2. Processing time: 104 ms. This was followed by the so-called Peace Rally, where demonstrations for peace took place week after week throughout Northern Ireland. In total, up to 500,000 people were motivated to participate, far more than for any peace movement in Northern Ireland so far. The main activists of the Community of Peoples of Peace, which had become the Woman for Peace, traveled in buses from city to city. In October 1976, an action was held in Trafalgar Square, London, in which the American singer and peace activist Joan Baez participated. International interest has raised nearly 300,000 British pounds to finance the construction of a headquarters, the Peace by Peace newspaper and some local projects. Betty Williams and Mairead Corrigan travelled across Europe, Australia and the United States to demonstrate in support of their goals. For Mairead Corrigan, non-violence continued to be the common thread of his work. Despite peace activities, the conflict in Northern Ireland has continued unabated; Media interest in the Peace People was not long in coming. Corrigan continued his work, supported by his deep Christian conviction, as before the Nobel Prize.

By December 1976, she had given up her profession to devote herself fully to political work. The violent incident was not the first or the last in the seven-year conflict in Northern Ireland; But it provoked many more reactions than others. The usual mutual accusations — was the 19-year-old IRA fighter the culprit or the British soldiers? — have been replaced by a weariness of the spiral of violence felt on both sides of the front. The children`s father and Mairead also refused to point to the media to name culprits. Translation takes longer than usual, Corrigan said. Wait or click here to open the translation in a new window. Mairead Corrigan was the second of seven children to have grown up in simple Catholic conditions in Belfast; His father was a window washer, his mother a housewife. When she was 13, her family moved to Andersonstown, a purely Catholic, socially disadvantaged neighborhood in Belfast. .